The Three Metrics We Can’t Live Without

As search engine marketers, we usually have a plethora of data at our fingertips. Sometimes, this information can be overwhelming, especially if you are new to the industry. Overtime, you learn which metrics are the most beneficial and can hone in on them. Here are our personal favorites:

If we’re talking at the highest level of metrics I’d take these three in this order: conversions, traffic sources, bounce rate. I’d know how well I was converting, where my traffic came from, and whether or not my content was driving people into the site. In a pinch, those would be my go-to metrics. Adam HenigeAdam Henige
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If you’re just starting out in SEO, I would recommend looking at these three important metrics: monthly and yearly organic traffic, landing pages, and queries. The monthly organic traffic monitors how well your keywords are performing. If you look at your yearly numbers, you get an idea of your traffic’s high and low periods. Knowing the top landing pages informs you of how users are finding your site, and helps you ensure that the content in these pages contains your selling points. Finally, the queries tells you the number of impressions or how many times your site appears in search results, the keywords used, as well as the click-through rate or CTR. Andrea BarnesAndrea Barnes
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As the Director of Technology I look at sites a bit differently from my SEO / SEM / PPC counterparts at Netvantage Marketing. In my world, the most important metrics are things like the type of server on which the site is running (basically Windows / IIS or Linux / Apache), the platform the website is built upon (WordPress, Drupal, hand-coded HTML, etc.), and the version number of all the software running on the machine (in other words, “How out-of-date is the software they’re using?”). These pieces of information will give me a nice picture of what actions might need to be taken given any specific client request. Jerod KaramJerod Karam
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It is hard to limit to three, but I take a PPC angle on this. I want to know how the paid search traffic is performing against other channels such as organic and direct traffic. From this, I like to look at bounce rate, average time on site, and conversions. This shows both overall soft retention, as well as the end goals of conversion from the channel in which you are paying for visitors. Joe FordJoe Ford
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With so many metrics available through Google Analytics, Webmaster Tools, and other tools, it is hard to pick just three. My top choice would be landing pages to get a feel for why site visitors are coming to the site. Going along with that, my second choice would be bounce rate. Are the site visitors actually staying on the site when they get there via organic search? Lastly, I would want to look at impressions in Google Webmaster Tools. Impressions will help determine where a site has a lot of potential, especially if there is a high number of impressions, but few clicks. Lexie KimballLexie Kimball
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Tough to narrow down, but here it goes. Year-to-Year Organic Search: Traffic goes up and down for a variety of reasons, including seasonality. Being able to compare apples to apples and the overall big picture of the project is extremely useful. Google Webmaster Tools messages: If Google finds something wrong with my website, I’d like to know immediately before really bad things happen and I am only left guessing. Goal completions: The name of the game is about getting qualified visitors who are going to convert. I’d also prefer Revenue if it is an E-commerce website. Michael HallMichael Hall
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Netvantage Marketing

Netvantage Marketing is a search engine marketing company founded in 2008. We assist businesses in a variety of industries with search engine optimization and paid search management.

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