Our Troubles With Content Creation

At Netvantage, we write a lot of content. Sometimes that content is for the body copy of a website, sometimes it is writing blog posts for the Netvantage site or clients’ sites, other times it is drafting link building emails. With all of the content we create, there are bound to be struggles along the way. Below we share our biggest struggles and you’ll notice a theme among many of our answers…

Abbey Hadar
Abbey Hadar
Twitter
Tone of voice can always be challenging when creating content for a new client. Even with the best intentions, it can be hard to control how you are read over the internet. Each client is different in the way that they want their audience to read and understand them. That means when writing for a client, it’s important to stick to how they want to appear to their audience. Does the client prefer formal or casual writing? Is the brand welcoming, entertaining, imaginative, confident, or sympathetic? These are all aspects to take into consideration when writing content for clients, and being able to write for each different tone of voice can be a challenge.
Adam Henige
Adam Henige
Twitter
Finding hooks. I don’t usually struggle to find topics for new content, but trying to continue to lure people into a large scale content piece requires some pacing and an appropriate use of interest inducing headers to continue to engage the visitor and hopefully push them into a call to action or further into the site.
Jerod Karam
Jerod Karam
Twitter
I figure that one of the most difficult things for everyone is to find a good solid topic to write about as well as a topic that hasn’t been covered nine-ways-to-Sunday. I have that problem as well so I’ll go with the second hardest thing for me in creating new content–including the appropriate level of detail so that the reader both understands the logical connections that I am trying to communicate but does not get bored with the article. Since I tend to write about more technical topics, it’s very difficult to find the right balance between detail and brevity, particularly when you know that your audience has quite varying levels of knowledge on your subject matter.
Joe Ford
Joe Ford
Twitter
First, you always want to try to cover an angle of subject matter that hasn’t been covered already. With the flood of blogs and content out there, this is a challenge. Additionally, you want to make sure it is good content. The rule I try to use is if another PPCer read this, is it something they could log into their AdWords account and use right away? Is it helpful? Is it impactful? That’s the hardest part.
Kyna Garrett
Kyna Garrett
Twitter
It may not seem like a very tough challenge, but development and formatting of content I find to be tricky at times. It’s just as important as what you choose to write and I always consider what format will resonate with readers best. If it’s a blog post, should it be a listicle or a dense article with visuals? Some audiences require quick, concise and bulleted content, while others might engage best with lengthy, thorough writing. It’s important to consider not only what your audience wants to engage with, but also how.
Lexie Kimball
Lexie Kimball
Twitter
I find that social media content is the hardest to create, especially for Twitter. With Twitter you only have so many characters and sometimes a lot more to say. Plus Twitter still counts characters for links, which decreases your space drastically. Writing for Facebook can also be a struggle. Recent studies show that shorter posts on Facebook receive more engagement, meaning less is more, making it hard to hook the audience and get them to click on a link.
Michael Hall
Michael Hall
Twitter
There is a misleading notion that if you create great content people will automatically link to it. This presumes that A. Your content is in fact linkable and B. there are websites out there that are well fitted to link to your content. For me, the most challenging part of creating content is addressing both of those issues. You could spend a lot of time putting together a phenomenal article on your company’s staff picnic, but who would want to link to that, and what types of websites would link to that? Content created for link building purposes must be link-worthy and have a large enough target audience to pitch for links.

Netvantage Marketing

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *